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Herb Spice: Organic Recipes and Information

 

 



Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic black pepper powder (Genus) Pipper nigrum


Black pepper is native to South India and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Black pepper is also cultivated in the Coorg area of Karnataka. Dried ground pepper is one of the most common spices in European cuisine and its descendants, having been known and prized since antiquity for both its flavour and its use as a medicine. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine. It may be found on nearly every dinner table in some parts of the world, often alongside table salt.

 

Pepper has been used as a spice in India since prehistoric times. Pepper is native to India and has been known to Indian cooking since at least 2000 BC. J. Innes Miller notes that while pepper was grown in southern Thailand and in Malaysia, its most important source was India, particularly the Malabar Coast, in what is now the state of Kerala. Peppercorns were a much prized trade good, often referred to as "black gold" and used as a form of commodity money. The term "peppercorn rent" still exists today.


Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from the piperine compound, which is found both in the outer fruit and in the seed.

Peppercorns are, by monetary value, the most widely traded spice in the world, accounting for 20 percent of all spice imports in 2002. The price of pepper can be volatile, and this figure fluctuates a great deal year to year; for example, pepper made up 39 percent of all spice imports in 1998. By weight, slightly more chilli peppers are traded worldwide than peppercorns. The International Pepper Exchange is located in Kochi, India.



Spicy Chicken Soup with Prawns – Singapore

 

Ingredients:

8 medium Prawns
4 cups Water
2 tablespoons Vegetable oil
2 medium onions, chopped
2 tablespoons grated ginger
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 tablespoon grated turmeric
1 tablespoon red chilli powder
250g diced chicken thigh fillets
8 candlenuts (cashews or pine nuts ok)
2 teaspoons cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon chopped coriander


Method:

Peel and de-vein the prawns. Set aside. Combine the water and the prawn shells in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 3-5 mins. Strain the prawn stock and set aside. Discard the shells.
In a medium pan, sauté the onion in the oil until transparent. Add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and chilli powder. Stir fry for 1-2 mins. Add the diced chicken and stir fry for a further 1-2 mins. Add the reserved prawn stock and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook uncovered until the chicken is almost done, 10-12 mins. Reduce to a low simmer.
Combine the candlenuts and peppercorns and grind to a powder. Mix this with the soy sauce to make a smooth paste (add a little water if necessary). Stir this into the simmering soup. Add the prawns and cook until done (3-4 mins). Serve hot, garnished with the coriander, with crusty bread.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic chilli powder (Genus) Capsicum annum

Chilli powder is a generic name for any powdered spice mix composed chiefly of chilli peppers, most commonly either red peppers or cayenne peppers, which are both of the species Capsicum annuum.





Prawn Curry – Goa

Ingredients:
6 dried red chillies
2 tablespoons grated turmeric
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
500 ml. coconut milk
1 cinnamon stick
4 green chillies, cut lengthways
2 cloves
2 tablespoons tamarind puree
2 cardamon pods
2 medium tomatoes
a little water
500 g peeled, deveined prawns
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
salt to taste
2 medium onions, sliced
1 tablespoon grated ginger

Method:
Dry roast the chilli, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cloves and cardamom. Grind to a powder.. Add enough water to make a paste. Set aside.
Heat vegetable oil in a large pan. Add onion and sauté until soft. Add the ginger, garlic and turmeric. Sauté briefly, then add the spice paste. Sauté for a few minutes. Add the coconut milk and green chillies. Bring to a rapid boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes.
Add the tamarind puree and tomatoes and simmer for 5-7 minutes.
Add the prawns and simmer for a further 4-7 mins until cooked.
Check the seasonings.
Serve hot over rice.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic cinnamon powder (Genus) Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Its flavour is due to an aromatic essential oil that makes up 0.5% to 1% of its composition. The name cinnamon comes from Greek kinnám?mon, itself ultimately from Phoenician. The botanical name for the spice—Cinnamomum zeylanicum—is derived from Sri Lanka's former (colonial) name, Ceylon.

Cinnamon has been known from remote antiquity, and it was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was regarded as a gift fit for monarchs and other great potentates. Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka. It was imported to Egypt from China as early as 2000 BC. It is mentioned in the Bible in Exodus 30:23, where Moses is commanded to use both sweet cinnamon and cassia in the holy anointing oil
Cinnamon bark is widely used as a spice. It is principally employed in cookery as a condiment and flavouring material. It's used in the preparation of chocolate, especially in Mexico, which is the main importer of true cinnamon. It is also used in the preparation of some kinds of desserts, such as apple pie and cinnamon buns as well as spicy candies, tea, hot cocoa, and liqueurs. True cinnamon, rather than cassia, is more suitable for use in sweet dishes.


In the Middle East, it is often used in savoury dishes of chicken and lamb.
In the United States, cinnamon and sugar are often used to flavour cereals, bread-based dishes, and fruits, especially apples; a cinnamon-sugar mixture is even sold separately for such purposes.
Cinnamon can also be used in pickling. Cinnamon bark is one of the few spices that can be consumed directly. Cinnamon powder has long been an important spice in Persian cuisine, used in a variety of thick soups, drinks, and sweets. It is often mixed with rosewater or other spices to make a cinnamon-based curry powder for stews or just sprinkled on sweet treats

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic coriander powder (Genus) Coriandrum sativum

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. It is also known as cilantro, particularly in the Americas. Coriander is native to southwestern Asia and west to North Africa.

The name coriander derives from French coriandre through Latin “coriandrum” in turn from Greek.

The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds or coriandi seeds. In some regions, the use of the word coriander in food preparation always refers to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant itself. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed, due to the presence of the terpenes linalool and pinene. It is also described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.

It is commonly found both as whole dried seeds and in ground form.

Coriander seed is a key spice (Hindi name: dhania, Dhaniyalu in telugu) in garam masala and Indian curries, which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with cumin. It also acts as a thickener. Roasted coriander seeds, called dhana dal, are also eaten as a snack. It is also the main ingredient of the two south Indian gravies: sambhar and rasam.

Coriander seems to have been cultivated in Greece since at least the second millennium BC. One of the Linear B tablets recovered from Pylos refers to the species as being cultivated for the manufacture of perfumes, and it appears that it was used in two forms: as a spice for its seeds and as a herb for the flavour of its leaves. This appears to be confirmed by archaeological evidence from the same period: the large quantities of the species retrieved from an Early Bronze Age layer at Sitagroi in Macedonia could point to cultivation of the species at that time.
Coriander seed and leaf was very widely used in medieval cuisine.


Prawn Curry – Goa

Ingredients:
6 dried red chillies
2 tablespoons grated turmeric
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
500 ml. coconut milk
1 cinnamon stick
4 green chillies, cut lengthways
2 cloves
2 tablespoons tamarind puree
2 cardamon pods
2 medium tomatoes
a little water
500 g peeled, deveined prawns
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
salt to taste
2 medium onions, sliced
1 tablespoon grated ginger

Method:
Dry roast the chilli, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cloves and cardamom. Grind to a powder.. Add enough water to make a paste. Set aside.
Heat vegetable oil in a large pan. Add onion and sauté until soft. Add the ginger, garlic and turmeric. Sauté briefly, then add the spice paste. Sauté for a few minutes. Add the coconut milk and green chillies. Bring to a rapid boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes.
Add the tamarind puree and tomatoes and simmer for 5-7 minutes.
Add the prawns and simmer for a further 4-7 mins until cooked.
Check the seasonings.
Serve hot over rice.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic cumin powder (Genus) Cuminum cyminum


Cumin can be used to season many dishes, either ground or as whole seeds, as it draws out their natural sweetnesses. It is traditionally added to curries, enchiladas, tacos, and other Middle-Eastern, Indian, Cuban and Mexican-style foods. While it can also be added to salsa to give it extra flavor, it is one of the main ingredients in making authentic Mexican guacamole. Cumin has also been used on meat in addition to other common seasonings.

The spice is native to Arabic-speaking Syria where cumin thrives in its hot and arid lands. Cumin seeds have been found in some ancient Syrian archeological sites. The word found its way from Syria to neighbouring Turkey and nearby Greece most likely before it found its way to Spain. Like many other Arabic words in the English language, cumin was acquired by Western Europe via Spain rather than the Grecian route.

Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family.

Cumin has been in use since ancient times.

Originally cultivated in Iran and Mediterranean region, cumin is mentioned in the Bible in both the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:27) and the New Testament (Matthew 23:23). It was also known in ancient Greece and Rome. The Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container (much as pepper is frequently kept today), and this practice continues in Morocco.

Today, cumin is the second most popular spice in the world after black pepper. Cumin seeds are used as a spice for their distinctive aroma, popular in Indian, Pakistan, North African, Middle Eastern, Sri Lankan, Cuban, Northern Mexican cuisines, and the Western Chinese cuisines of Sichuan and Xinjiang. Cumin can be found in some Dutch cheeses like Leyden cheese, and in some traditional breads from France. It is also commonly used in traditional Brazilian cuisine.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic cumin seeds (Genus) Cuminum cyminum


Cumin can be used to season many dishes, either ground or as whole seeds, as it draws out their natural sweetnesses. It is traditionally added to curries, enchiladas, tacos, and other Middle-Eastern, Indian, Cuban and Mexican-style foods. While it can also be added to salsa to give it extra flavor, it is one of the main ingredients in making authentic Mexican guacamole. Cumin has also been used on meat in addition to other common seasonings.

The spice is native to Arabic-speaking Syria where cumin thrives in its hot and arid lands. Cumin seeds have been found in some ancient Syrian archeological sites. The word found its way from Syria to neighbouring Turkey and nearby Greece most likely before it found its way to Spain. Like many other Arabic words in the English language, cumin was acquired by Western Europe via Spain rather than the Grecian route.

Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family.

Cumin has been in use since ancient times.

Originally cultivated in Iran and Mediterranean region, cumin is mentioned in the Bible in both the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:27) and the New Testament (Matthew 23:23). It was also known in ancient Greece and Rome. The Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container (much as pepper is frequently kept today), and this practice continues in Morocco.

Today, cumin is the second most popular spice in the world after black pepper. Cumin seeds are used as a spice for their distinctive aroma, popular in Indian, Pakistan, North African, Middle Eastern, Sri Lankan, Cuban, Northern Mexican cuisines, and the Western Chinese cuisines of Sichuan and Xinjiang. Cumin can be found in some Dutch cheeses like Leyden cheese, and in some traditional breads from France. It is also commonly used in traditional Brazilian cuisine.




Prawn Curry – Goa

 

Ingredients:

6 dried red chillies
2 tablespoons grated turmeric
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
500 ml. coconut milk
1 cinnamon stick
4 green chillies, cut lengthways
2 cloves
2 tablespoons tamarind puree
2 cardamon pods
2 medium tomatoes
a little water
500 g peeled, deveined prawns
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
salt to taste
2 medium onions, sliced
1 tablespoon grated ginger

Method:

Dry roast the chilli, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cloves and cardamom. Grind to a powder.. Add enough water to make a paste. Set aside.
Heat vegetable oil in a large pan. Add onion and sauté until soft. Add the ginger, garlic and turmeric. Sauté briefly, then add the spice paste. Sauté for a few minutes. Add the coconut milk and green chillies. Bring to a rapid boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes.
Add the tamarind puree and tomatoes and simmer for 5-7 minutes.
Add the prawns and simmer for a further 4-7 mins until cooked.
Check the seasonings.
Serve hot over rice.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic curry powder mild


Originated in the eastern states of India this traditional blend of spices consisting of coriander, cumin, ginger, fenugreek, chilli, turmeric, fennel, cardamom, black pepper, and cinnamon will make it easy for you to produce an authentic Indian curry of just about anything you would like to prepare it with, eggs, lamb, chicken, vegetable, fish.

Curry powder, also known as masala powder, is a spice mixture of widely varying composition developed by the British during the days of the Raj as a means of approximating the taste of Indian cuisine at home. Masala refers to spices, and this is the name given to the thick and pasty sauce based on a combination of spices with ghee (clarified butter), butter, palm oil or coconut milk. Most commercial curry powders available in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, rely heavily on ground turmeric, in turn producing a very yellow sauce. Lesser ingredients in these Western yellow curry powders are often coriander, cumin, fenugreek, mustard, chilli, black pepper and salt.

It should be reiterated that curry powders and pastes produced and consumed in India are extremely diverse; some red, some yellow, some brown; some with five spices and some with as many as 20 or more. Besides the previously mentioned spices, other commonly found spices in different curry powders in India are allspice, white pepper, ground mustard, ground ginger, cinnamon, roasted cumin, cloves, nutmeg, mace, green cardamom seeds or black cardamom pods, bay leaves and coriander seeds.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic curry powder medium

Originated in the eastern states of India this traditional blend of spices consisting of cumin, chilli, ginger, coriander, fennel, fenugreek, turmeric, cinnamon, cardamom, and black pepper, will make it easy for you to produce an authentic Indian curry of just about anything you would like to prepare it with, eggs, lamb, chicken, vegetable, fish.

Curry powder, also known as masala powder, is a spice mixture of widely varying composition developed by the British during the days of the Raj as a means of approximating the taste of Indian cuisine at home. Masala refers to spices, and this is the name given to the thick and pasty sauce based on a combination of spices with ghee (clarified butter), butter, palm oil or coconut milk.

Most commercial curry powders available in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, rely heavily on ground turmeric, in turn producing a very yellow sauce. Lesser ingredients in these Western yellow curry powders are often coriander, cumin, fenugreek, mustard, chilli, black pepper and salt. It should be reiterated that curry powders and pastes produced and consumed in India are extremely diverse; some red, some yellow, some brown; some with five spices and some with as many as 20 or more. Besides the previously mentioned spices, other commonly found spices in different curry powders in India are allspice, white pepper, ground mustard, ground ginger, cinnamon, roasted cumin, cloves, nutmeg, mace, green cardamom seeds or black cardamom pods, bay leaves and coriander seeds.

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Pure Food Essentials use and recommend organic turmeric powder (Genus) Curcuma longa

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae.

In non-South Asian recipes, turmeric is sometimes used as an agent to impart a rich, custard-like yellow colour. It has found application in canned beverages, baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, yellow cakes, orange juice, biscuits, popcorn colour, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatins, etc. It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is used in savoury dishes, not sweet ones.

Although usually used in its dried, powdered form, Turmeric is also used fresh - much like ginger. It has numerous uses in Far East recipes, such as fresh turmeric pickle (which contains large chunks of soft turmeric).

In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric is thought to have many medicinal properties and many in South Asia (particularly India) use it as a readily available antiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. Practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine say it has fluoride which is thought to be essential for teeth. It is also used as an antibacterial agent.

It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. Pakistanis also use it as an anti-inflammatory agent, and remedy for gastrointestinal discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders. In Afghanistan and North West Pakistan, turmeric is applied to a piece of burnt cloth, and placed over a wound to cleanse and stimulate recovery. Indians, in addition to its Ayurvedic properties, use turmeric in a wide variety of skin creams that are also exported to neighbouring countries. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease, cancer and liver disorders.



Turmeric rhizome

It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. In the latter half of the 20th century, curcumin was identified as responsible for most of the biological effects of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal, research activity into curcumin is exploding. In that year supplement sales increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health had four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer's, and colorectal cancer. Of great interest in the field of Neuroscience is the fact that one of its major functional chemical components enhances the production of BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor). Other BDNF enhancing factors include Glutamate, Exercise, Caloric Restriction, Intellectual Stimulation, and brain injury (as a compensatory mechanism).



Sweet Potato, turmeric and coconut Soup

 

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 brown onions
8cm piece turmeric, grated
7cm piece galangal, peeled, bruised
2 birdseye chillies, deseeded, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves
900g orange sweet potato, peeled and cubed
1.125litres vegetable stock
1 can coconut milk
salt and ground black pepper to taste

Method:

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onions, turmeric, galangal, chillies and garlic. Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes or until the onions soften. Add the sweet potato and stir well.
Add the stock, increase heat to high and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to med-low, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 mins or until the potato is soft. Discard the galangal. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend until smooth. Return to a clean pan.
Add coconut milk and heat, stirring constantly until hot. Do not boil.
Taste and season with salt and pepper.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and serve with bread.



Mixed Vegetable Curry – Burma

 

Ingredients:

4 tablespoons sesame oil
2 medium Onions, chopped
2 tablespoons grated ginger
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 tablespoon grated turmeric
11/2 teaspoons blanchan (dried shrimp paste)
500g mixed vegetables cut into 1cm pieces
4 green chillies chopped
300ml coconut milk
a little water
salt, to taste
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves for garnish

Method:

Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion and sauté until soft. Add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and blanchan. Sauté for 2-3 minutes. Add the vegetables and green chilli and cook over a medium heat for 5-7 minutes, until tender. Now add the coconut milk and a little water if necessary. Check the seasoning and add a little salt if desired. Serve hot sprinkled with coriander leaves.

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