Organic products Diet Products Which Soup Is Known As Beef Tea?

Which Soup Is Known As Beef Tea?

Which Soup Is Known As Beef Tea

Bovril

Bovril (250 g jar)
Inventor John Lawson Johnston
Inception 1889 ; 133 years ago
Manufacturer Bovril Company
Current supplier Unilever

Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick and salty meat extract paste similar to a yeast extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston, It is sold in a distinctive bulbous jar, and as cubes and granules. Bovril is owned and distributed by Unilever UK.

Which soup is also known as beef tea?

What is Beef Tea? – Beef tea is a simple decoction made by steeping beef – usually rump – in water for a couple of hours, seasoned with, This mild meat tea was often used as a remedy in Britain for all kinds of health conditions, including colds, coughs, and recovery after different kinds of viral infections.

  1. The tea differs from beef broth or bone broth as it is made by steeping meat and not the bones.
  2. It is a soothing liquid traditionally served hot in a teacup and enjoyed on cold days to revitalize the body.
  3. Beef tea was first documented as a beverage in 1760 in Dublin, Ireland in an edition of the Dublin Courier.

In the 1900s, the tea was prescribed to and was a popular dish on hospital menus. However, it lost its sheen after many people, including, doubted its efficacy. Beef tea also received flak for its high meat wastage; a report in the Pall Mall Gazette that 62,000 lbs of beef were being used annually to make tea in one London hospital alone. Beef tea is an ancient health remedy used to nourish the body. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

What is the beef tea?

Beef tea in British English noun. a drink made by boiling pieces of lean beef : often given to invalids to stimulate the appetite.

What is hot beef tea?

: a beverage prepared by extracting finely cut lean beef with hot water or by dissolving commercial beef extract in boiling water compare beef extract, bouillon

Is beef tea same as beef broth?

How Bone Broth Got its Early Start From 19th Century Beef Tea Unless a person has actually been living in the Museum of Natural History’s Paleolithic exhibit, it’s impossible to ignore the fact that bone broth has into the spotlight as the latest cure-for-what-ails.

Flowing forth from the current culinary climate’s skepticism towards gluten and the rise of the Paleo diet (which encourages dining like our meat-and-berry-gnawing caveman-bro ancestors), bone broth has become the latest tonic aimed to settle the stomachs—and consciences—of both “clean” eaters and the dubiously curious.

The subtle variations (if any) between bone broth and its more familiar counterparts stock, consommé and bouillon aside, what bone broth lacks in ho-hum sepia-toned aesthetics it more than makes up for in almost evangelical fanfare regarding its purported health benefits.

Crafted by—you guessed it—boiling bone-in meat for 12 to 48 hours (the addition of aromatics like onion and garlic are optional), the gelatinous proteins and nutritional nuggets locked away inside the bones are unleashed while cooked down, ready to be poured into the cups of anxious fans as a slightly gelled, sippable elixir.

Broth aficionados swear that the drink provides them with a laundry list of health benefits, including increased energy, better sleep, plumper skin, stronger joints and an improved immune system. The concept of broth as salve is nothing new, with chefs and writers alike quick to point out how varying takes on the slurpable liquid transcend cultural bounds. Brodo in New York is responsible for igniting the current bone broth craze. The first recorded instance of beef tea (which is exactly as it sounds) as a beverage can be found in a 1760 edition of the Dublin Courier, in which it is exalted as a hearty, health-focused drink.

When it is cold, decant a pint from beef, which looks like a light infusion of fine green tea,” the paper writes. ” has a very grateful flavor, and is more strengthening than stronger broths.” The majority of recipes for beef tea from the early 1800s call for a cut of rump meat (it’s always rump meat) boiled down for roughly one to two hours with water and maybe a sprinkle of salt.

By the 1860s, though, recipes began to add in textural components and mild aromatics including slivers of butter, “button onions” (pearl onions), clove and a pinch or two of salt for good measure. beef tea is perhaps the cleverest means by which to extend the shelf life of this all-important, nutrient rich commodity by—essentially—diluting it.

While it’s safe to say that most home cooks in Dickensian England weren’t exactly experimental culinary demi-gods, there’s something undeniably resourceful, inventive and almost reverent about beef tea’s earnest simplicity. The British experimented with many methods for stretching out the livelihood of their most precious victual (potting, drying and pickling meat), but beef tea is perhaps the cleverest means by which to extend the shelf life of this all-important, nutrient rich commodity by—essentially—diluting it.

The recipe is almost alarmingly familiar and, strangely enough, practically on trend today. Except for a shorter boiling time and a bone-versus-meat-only argument, beef tea and bone broth are almost identical in their preparation methods, means of consumption and—in many instances—their purported benefits.

While beef tea was consumed in homes on a regular basis, it was mostly considered a beverage for the unwell, with the drink often called “invalid” beef tea in reference to its popularity as a sick ward remedy. If you think hospital food is bad today, the quasi-wellness-inducing culinary options of yesteryear will make you squirm.

Doctor-approved “health-boosting” diets in the 1800s were severely limited, with a regimen of milky pudding or grains muddled with wine, two frequently doled out “cures.” For the truly sick, though, beef tea reigned supreme. The drink was ladled into cups by the gallon for seemingly lost-cause cases, baffling doctors and nurses (who had yet to discover the science behind vitamins and minerals) as to why it seemed to help patients’ conditions.

Beef tea may be chosen as an illustration of great nutrient power in sickness.” -Florence Nightingale “Beef tea may be chosen as an illustration of great nutrient power in sickness,” noted Florence Nightingale in 1860. “There is a certain reparative quality in it—we do not know what—as there is in tea; but it may be safely given in almost any inflammatory disease.where much nourishment is required.” In many cases, it was treated like a miracle cure when nothing else worked to keep patients alive, and was treated with the same kind of magical thinking that is currently swirling around the bone broth trend.

“Everyone will be struck with the readiness with which certain classes of patients will often take, beef tea repeatedly, when they refuse all other kinds of food,” recounted well-known 1850s physician Dr. Christison. “This is particularly remarkable in the case of gastric fever in which little or nothing else besides beef tea has been taken for weeks,

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The result is so striking. What is its mode of action? Possibly it belongs to a new denomination of remedies.” Of course, nothing gold—or trendy—can stay. By the 1880s, beef tea began to get serious blowback from the medical community, who believed it to have little nutritional value and perhaps even be dangerous for those ailing.

” whether beef tea may not very frequently be actually injurious, and whether the products of muscular waste, which constitute, beef tea, may not under certain circumstances be actually poisonous,” wrote Dr. Lauder Brunton in 1880.

  • The hype-trend-blowback cycle for the latest health food fad might not be as old as our prehistoric ancestors, but it’s definitely nothing new.
  • Some doctors also believed, curiously, that beef tea and the consumption of urine held similar medicinal benefits.

Even as its reputation as a nutrient-packed super-drink faded, there was still some belief that beef tea—instead of being fortifying—could work as a stimulant. Some doctors also believed, curiously, that beef tea and the consumption of urine held similar medicinal benefits. In 1870, a Scottish chemist named John Lawson Johnston was tasked by Napoleon III with delivering one million cans of beef to the troops during the Franco-Prussian War, which quickly revealed itself as a logistical nightmare. Putting his scientific (and, perhaps, historic) know-how to good use, Johnston created a product he called “fluid beef” that proved to be easier to transport.

  1. The drink was, essentially, beef tea.
  2. The company branded itself “Bovril” in 1886 and has since become synonymous with English identity, winding its way into pop culture, tea kettles and the thermoses of soccer fans across the country for decades.
  3. Bovril, alongside more traditional beef tea preparations, served as a mealtime staple on the front lines of World War I for English soldiers, contributing to the hail-hardiness of the men, but also gout and boils brought on by excessive protein in their diets.

The company’s advertisements have inspired a cult following of collectors, and Bovril remains one of the few products (much less beverages) to be officially, Today, Bovril is omnipresent, and perhaps best known as the preferred beverage to fend off winter chills when visiting soccer stadiums from Arsenal to Aston Villa, where the beefy potion peps up fans.

  1. So when Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys are sitting courtside at the Knicks game sipping cups of bone broth, don’t say I didn’t warn you.
  2. Lead image from

: How Bone Broth Got its Early Start From 19th Century Beef Tea

What is another name of beef tea?

Bovril

Bovril (250 g jar)
Inventor John Lawson Johnston
Inception 1889 ; 133 years ago
Manufacturer Bovril Company
Current supplier Unilever

Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick and salty meat extract paste similar to a yeast extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston, It is sold in a distinctive bulbous jar, and as cubes and granules. Bovril is owned and distributed by Unilever UK.

Is also called as beef tea?

Bovril – Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick, salty meat extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston. It is sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar. Bovril is made in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire; owned and distributed by Unilever UK. Bovril can be made into a drink by diluting with hot water, or less commonly, with milk.

What is beef tea made of?

The clear liquid from beef which has been boiled until fallen, strained and skimmed of all fat. Beef tea has long been assumed to somehow incorporate all the ‘goodness’ from the meat, and so be an ideal food for invalids, though even Mrs.B was rather doubtful. Original Receipt in Hammond 1819 ; Beef tea. Take a pound of beef perfectly lean, chop it into small pieces, and boil it in one gallon of water with a slice of under-crust of white bread, and a small portion of salt; let it boil till reduced to two quarts, then strain it, and make use of it as necessary. Original Receipt from ‘ Pot-luck; or, The British home cookery book ‘ by May Byron ( Byron 1914 ) 1076. BEEF TEA (Lancashire) One pound of gravy beef, one pint of cold water, half a teaspoonful of salt. Shred meat finely, place in an earthenware jar, add the water and salt.

  • Cover closely.
  • Place jar in a saucepan of boiling water, or in the oven, and cook for three hours.
  • Stir occasionally.
  • ‘Bovril’ is a condensed beef tea in paste form, invented in 1886 by Scotsman John Lawson Johnston at the request of Napoleon III as a sustaining drink for his troops.
  • Johnston took the name from ‘Bovine’, as in cattle, and the magical fluid ‘Vril’ which gave all those subterranean super-humans their astonishing powers in Bulwer-Lytton’s 1870 novel ‘ The Coming Race ‘.

Somewhat shockingly, during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy scare of 2004-6, Bovril was manufactured without beef, using a Marmite -like yeast extract. Hardly anybody noticed. Yorkshire Evening Post – Saturday 06 January 1900, preferable to dried vipers. Dublin Courier – Friday 04 January 1760

Why is beef tea good for you?

Beef tea, a very 19th century remedy | RCP Museum If you open a book about 19th century dietary remedies it would be hard to find one that does not mention beef tea. It was a type of broth – made with beef and water – given to patients to drink if they were suffering from digestive problems, fever or weakness.

  • People believed that the tea was nutritious and easy on the stomach, which would help patients to return to their former fortitude.
  • For those of you curious as to how this beef tea was made, two recipes appear in,
  • Ellis’ recipe required that one pound of lean beef be shredded and boiled with one quart of water for 20 minutes, with any scum that formed on the surface being removed.

Once the tea was cold it could be strained and served. The recipe from AT Thomson recommended that a ‘good rump steak’ be shredded and sprinkled with salt and left in a hollow dish. Water should then be poured into the dish and left near a fire for 30 minutes. is a guide created to aid staff and students of the hospital in ‘the art of prescribing’. It covers many aspects of hospital work including, how to take case notes on a ward, prescribing for children, poison antidotes and diets for patients. Beef tea featured heavily in meal plans; on being admitted to hospital, patients subsisted on a diet made up of 12 oz of bread, 2 pints of milk and 1 pint of beef tea. Report upon the state of the hospitals of the British army in the Crimea and Scutari, together with an appendix, Great Britain War Office, published London, 1855. Despite beef tea’s popularity – it even appeared in classic novels such as What Katy did next – its efficacy was beginning to be questioned.

This was important as it was reported in the Pall Mall gazette that 62,000 lbs of beef a year were being used to make the tea in alone., an RCP fellow, even went so far as to suggest that beef tea may potentially have been hazardous to patients, due to its high content of ‘muscular waste’. also doubted its reputation as a panacea, stating that it was a common error to believe that it was the most nutritious foodstuff that a patient could be given.

However, this 19th century tea is reportedly, though mostly for its flavour rather than for curing fevers. Alana Farrell, UK Medical Heritage Library project coordinator For more digitised books from the RCP collection please visit the UK Medical Heritage Library via the or the,

What is the juice from beef called?

That red juice oozing out of your steak isn’t blood

While many of us love munching on a medium-rare, juicy steak, others balk at the idea of it.Admittedly, seeing blood-like liquid oozing out of the meat when you cut into it isn’t always the most appetizing of sights.It also looks pretty grim when you buy it, as it’s usually swimming in a ghoulish pool of red fluid.But we have news for you – the liquid present in the meat packaging, and the stuff that trickles onto your plate once it’s cooked, is not actually blood.If you think about it, steak doesn’t taste like actual blood – if it did it probably wouldn’t be such a popular dish.The red liquid is actually myoglobin, a protein that’s only found in muscle tissue.Myoglobin carries oxygen through the muscle and contains a red pigment – which is why muscle tissue is red.As a steak is cooked, the myoglobin darkens – which is why the more “well-done” the meat is, the grayer it looks.Interestingly, commercial meat packers sometimes treat raw steaks with carbon monoxide to “lock” in the myoglobin and keep it looking a nice, fresh red color.Do rare steaks look a little more appetizing to you now?

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: That red juice oozing out of your steak isn’t blood

Is broth just meat tea?

‘Stock’ is golden meat tea that is being put to use as an ingredient in something else; ‘broth’ is that same golden meat tea, when it is rerouted from further cooking and put directly into your mouth.’

What is beef drink?

Bovril Beef Paste is the original beefy hot drink that has been keeping Britain’s chin up for decades, fuelling Brits to face all the elements. Great for warming you up in the great outdoors, at the football, or on those cold winter nights, Bovril is as simple as it is versatile.

Is beef a cow meat?

Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of mature or almost mature cattle is mostly known as beef, In beef production there are three main stages: cow-calf operations, backgrounding, and feedlot operations.

  • The production cycle of the animals starts at cow-calf operations; this operation is designed specifically to breed cows for their offspring.
  • From here the calves are backgrounded for a feedlot,
  • Animals grown specifically for the feedlot are known as feeder cattle, the goal of these animals is fattening.

Animals not grown for a feedlot are typically female and are commonly known as replacement heifers, While the principal use of beef cattle is meat production, other uses include leather, and beef by-products used in candy, shampoo, cosmetics, and insulin,

Is oxo a beef tea?

Beef Tea – great for cold & flu sufferers – I have not tried Hot Bovril or Beef Tea for 20 years but under the effects of a cold (Man Flu!) I tried a cup recently and although I could not taste or smell it, very good it was, I would imagine a slightly salty beefy drink! Another option is the Oxo cube topped up with hot water a pinch of white pepper & served in a mug, have you noticed Oxo cubes are now X shaped! Both Bovril & Oxo have fed various Armed Forces over the years with Bovril being invented to feed French Troops in 1886. Oxo was included in WW1 troop rations and even sponsored the 1908 London Olympics. Homemade Beef Tea Ingredients:

  • 450g/1lbs beef shin or skirt (you can really use any cut of beef)
  • 500mls/17 fl oz cold water
  • teaspoon of salt
  • White pepper to taste

Method:

  1. cube the beef & brown off in a pan with a little butter
  2. add beef & juices from the pan to a jam jar or wide mouth bottle
  3. seal container with greaseproof paper & string
  4. place container in pan of water and gentle simmer for 2 to 3 hours
  5. allow to cool & skim off any scum & fat
  6. strain, season to taste & serve

Is there real beef in beef broth?

Commercial beef broths contain almost no beef.

Is beef broth just beef stock?

The Bottom Line – The terms “broth” and “stock” are often used interchangeably. Though their ingredients are largely the same, there is a difference between them. Stock is made from bones, while broth is made mostly from meat or vegetables. Using bones in stock creates a thicker liquid, while broth tends to be thinner and more flavorful.

Is there another name for beef tongue?

Removing skin from boiled beef tongue Beef tongue (also known as neat’s tongue or ox tongue ) is a cut of beef made of the tongue of a cow, It can be boiled, pickled, roasted or braised in sauce. It is found in many national cuisines, and is used for taco fillings in Mexico and for open-faced sandwiches in the United States.

In France and Belgium it is served with Madeira sauce, while chrain is the preferred accompaniment in Ashkenazi and Eastern European cuisines, Germans make white roux with vinegar and capers, or horseradish cream, which is also popular in Polish cuisine, Beef tongue is very high in fat, which contributes up to 72% of its caloric content.

Some countries, including Canada and specifically the province of Alberta, export large quantities of beef tongue.

What is the original name for tea?

Worldwide spread – Tea was first introduced to Western priests and merchants in China during the 16th century, at which time it was termed chá, The earliest European reference to tea, written as chiai, came from Delle navigationi e viaggi written by Venetian Giambattista Ramusio in 1545.

The first recorded shipment of tea by a European nation was in 1607 when the Dutch East India Company moved a cargo of tea from Macao to Java, then two years later, the Dutch bought the first assignment of tea which was from Hirado in Japan to be shipped to Europe. Tea became a fashionable drink in The Hague in the Netherlands, and the Dutch introduced the drink to Germany, France, and across the Atlantic to New Amsterdam (New York).

In 1567, Russian people came in contact with tea when the Cossack Atamans Petrov and Yalyshev visited China. The Mongolian Khan donated to Tsar Michael I four poods (65–70 kg) of tea in 1638. According to Jeremiah Curtin, it was possibly in 1636 that Vassili Starkov was sent as envoy to the Altyn Khan, The Raymond, Hugh Mckay Commander. The first vessel direct from China to Hull on her arrival on 14 October 1843 with a cargo of tea. The first record of tea in English came from a letter written by Richard Wickham, who ran an East India Company office in Japan, writing to a merchant in Macao requesting “the best sort of chaw” in 1615.

Peter Mundy, a traveller and merchant who came across tea in Fujian in 1637, wrote, ” chaa – only water with a kind of herb boyled in it”. Tea was sold in a coffee house in London in 1657, Samuel Pepys tasted tea in 1660, and Catherine of Braganza took the tea-drinking habit to the English court when she married Charles II in 1662.

Tea, however, was not widely consumed in the British Isles until the 18th century and remained expensive until the latter part of that period. English drinkers preferred to add sugar and milk to black tea, and black tea overtook green tea in popularity in the 1720s.

Tea smuggling during the 18th century led to the general public being able to afford and consume tea. The British government removed the tax on tea, thereby eliminating the smuggling trade, by 1785. In Britain and Ireland, tea was initially consumed as a luxury item on special occasions, such as religious festivals, wakes, and domestic work gatherings.

The price of tea in Europe fell steadily during the 19th century, especially after Indian tea began to arrive in large quantities; by the late 19th century tea had become an everyday beverage for all levels of society. The popularity of tea played a role in historical events – the Tea Act of 1773 provoked the Boston Tea Party that escalated into the American Revolution,

The need to address the issue of British trade deficit because of the trade in tea resulted in the Opium Wars, The Qing Kangxi Emperor had banned foreign products from being sold in China, decreeing in 1685 that all goods bought from China must be paid for in silver coin or bullion. Traders from other nations then sought to find another product, in this case opium, to sell to China to earn back the silver they were required to pay for tea and other commodities.

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The subsequent attempts by the Chinese Government to curtail the trade in opium led to war. Chinese small-leaf-type tea was introduced into India in 1836 by the British in an attempt to break the Chinese monopoly on tea. In 1841, Archibald Campbell brought seeds of Chinese tea from the Kumaun region and experimented with planting tea in Darjeeling,

  1. The Alubari tea garden was opened in 1856, and Darjeeling tea began to be produced.
  2. In 1848, Robert Fortune was sent by the Honourable East India Company on a mission to China to bring the tea plant back to Great Britain.
  3. He began his journey in high secrecy as his mission occurred in the lull between the First Opium War and the Second Opium War,

The Chinese tea plants he brought back were introduced to the Himalayas, though most did not survive. The British had discovered that a different variety of tea was endemic to Assam and the northeast region of India, which was then hybridized with Chinese small-leaf-type tea.

Using Chinese planting and cultivation techniques, the British colonial government established a tea industry by offering land in Assam to any European who agreed to cultivate it for export. Tea was originally consumed only by Anglo-Indians ; however, it became widely popular in India in the 1950s because of a successful advertising campaign by the India Tea Board.

The British introduced tea industry to Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) in 1867.

What is the full name of tea?

How does Camellia sinensis become the name? The scientific name of the tea plant is Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze. That means all plants from which tea is made are described by this name. You all know that the common names of plants often vary from region to region, which is why most plant encyclopedias refer to plants using their scientific names, in other words using binomials or “Latin” names.

Scientific names follow a specific set of rules. Scientists use a two-name system called a Binomial Naming System. They name plants using the system that describes the genus and species of the plant. The first word is the genus and the second is the species. How does the scientific name of tea plant become Camellia sinensis? It has a long history.

Tea’s scientific name has been changed multiple times since its first use. The first name of tea plant was given by Linnaeus in1753 as Thea sinensis and it was published in the First volume of his famous book “Species Planterum”. He typified this name for China tea based on some drawings drawn by Kaempfer.

Kaempfer was a surgeon of the Dutch East India Company stationed in Japan who drew these drawings of tea plant in 1712, but without collecting the specimen. However, in 1762, Linnaeus again distinguished two kinds of tea and named them Thea viridis and Thea bohea. The former was supposed to produce green tea and the later black tea.

The specific name sinensis was dropped. But when it was found that both black and green tea could be made from the same plant, the name Thea viridis was dropped, retaining the name Thea bohea for the tea plant. This started a kind of confusion and the botanists of different countries were found to use different names, some eleven different names, for the tea plant like Thea sinensis, Camellia thea etc.

However, the Botanical Congress in its session held in Amsterdam in 1935, decided to unite the two genera Thea and Camellia into a single genus, Camellia and under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the name of the plant wasassigned as Camellia sinensis (L). Technically, Camellia sinensis (L.) O.

Kuntze is the full name of the tea plant, since it gives reorganization to the authority responsible for the union of the old name sinensis with the new genus Camellia. In the name, Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze, the L. indicates that Linnaeus who first published the epithet sinensis and O.Kuntze indicates that this botanist was the first to combine, in a publication of 1881, the two generic names.

What is another name for a beef roast?

Also: arm roast, pot roast. The clod or arm is leaner and a little less expensive than chuck.

Is goat called beef?

Why am I writing article on names of Meat? – I was on a queue at a restaurant waiting to make my order when the man standing in front of me started raising his voice. I listened and found out that he was arguing with the waitress over names of meats. The man already bought rice and plantain when this poor waitress asked what else the man wanted.

  • Put one meat”, the man replied.
  • The waitress then asked him what kind of meat the man wanted to which the man replied, “What do you mean? Just put one meat”.
  • RECOMMENDED: Is The Red Liquid That Drips Raw Red Meat Blood? Is It Safe? I could see the frustration on the face of the waitress but she calmly replied, “but sir, we have different types of meat, like beef, pork”.

The man interrupted by asking one hilarious question: “why would you put pork? Is pork meat? Pork is pork and there is cow meat and goat meat!” I had to add my voice to save the helpless waitress. This was when I thought I should write about this because others joined the argument and I found out that people only knew what the meats from cattle and pig are called – beef and pork.

What is another name for beef meat?

Beef Synonyms – WordHippo Thesaurus. What is another word for beef?

muscle meat
tissue flesh
sinews thews
brawn bulk
sinew thew

Is beef consomme a soup?

Campbell’s® Condensed Beef Consomme is rich and flavorful soup made from concentrated beef stock. This is perfect to be used as a secret ingredient for your next family-pleasing dinner.

What is another name for a beef roast?

Also: arm roast, pot roast. The clod or arm is leaner and a little less expensive than chuck.

What is another name for beef stew?

What is another word for beef stew?

beef bourguignon beef casserole
beef Stroganoff hotpot
lobscouse scouse

Is oxo a beef tea?

Beef Tea – great for cold & flu sufferers – I have not tried Hot Bovril or Beef Tea for 20 years but under the effects of a cold (Man Flu!) I tried a cup recently and although I could not taste or smell it, very good it was, I would imagine a slightly salty beefy drink! Another option is the Oxo cube topped up with hot water a pinch of white pepper & served in a mug, have you noticed Oxo cubes are now X shaped! Both Bovril & Oxo have fed various Armed Forces over the years with Bovril being invented to feed French Troops in 1886. Oxo was included in WW1 troop rations and even sponsored the 1908 London Olympics. Homemade Beef Tea Ingredients:

  • 450g/1lbs beef shin or skirt (you can really use any cut of beef)
  • 500mls/17 fl oz cold water
  • teaspoon of salt
  • White pepper to taste

Method:

  1. cube the beef & brown off in a pan with a little butter
  2. add beef & juices from the pan to a jam jar or wide mouth bottle
  3. seal container with greaseproof paper & string
  4. place container in pan of water and gentle simmer for 2 to 3 hours
  5. allow to cool & skim off any scum & fat
  6. strain, season to taste & serve