Organic products Organic Products Why Is The Curry Song Offensive?

Why Is The Curry Song Offensive?

Why Is The Curry Song Offensive
South Asian SEVENTEEN Fans Deserve to Be Heard In this op-ed, writer Anjana Pawa unpacks the fan and artist response to a recent incident where members of SEVENTEEN were filmed singing to a Norazo song called “Curry,” which has lyrics that contain harmful South Asian stereotypes.

  • This piece is with the members of SEVENTEEN, which occurred before this segment was aired.
  • On July 13, K-pop boy group SEVENTEEN of their weekly variety show Going Seventeen, where the 13 members of the group participate in challenges and games for their fans (referred to as “Carats”) to enjoy.
  • In the episode, the members did mock-auditions for a singing competition show.

Each member one went up and sang a song in front of their assigned judges; Wonwoo sang a song that Korean fans instantly recognized as “Curry.” After a few hours, fans began to realize the song was familiar — it had been sung before by some members of the group on a vlog series called “Inside Seventeen.” Back in April, an episode of this series was on the group’s YouTube channel.

In it, the members take a trip to an Indian restaurant in San Jose during their recent North American tour. As they dip their naan into their curry on the table in front of them, they can be heard singing the same tune. “Curry” is a song by a K-pop duo called Norazo. Originally released 10 years ago, became a,

The song’s music depicts one of the members of Norazo wearing brownface while singing the lyrics, “Shanti, Shanti / Yoga, Fire / I love hot curry” and imitating a traditional South Asian dance. “Curry” became a household hit, the remnants of which still exist in the country’s pop culture references.

  1. But the song and its music video, both of which feature harmful assumptions and stereotypes of South Asian people, reveal issues of culturally-rooted racism that still exists in South Korea and other countries.
  2. Immediately following the episode, South Asian fans began to voice their concerns on social media.

They shared their thoughts via email and posts on fan platform Weverse, following a to explain why the artist’s actions were hurtful. On Twitter, trended the hashtags #PLEDISReleaseTheStatement and #PLEDISApologise, a call to action for SEVENTEEN’s management team, Pledis, to address the controversy.

They have thus far been met with silence, and Pledis also declined Teen Vogue ‘s request for comment. Seeing K-pop and South Asian motifs or references combined isn’t exactly new. Recently, it has existed in two forms in Korean idol spaces: first, as an aesthetic, like when BLACKPINK used a statue of a Hindu deity on the set of their latest music video for “How You Like That,” or when (G)I-DLE in front of a backdrop of a mosque at the 2019 Golden Disc Awards.

The second way is the subject of mockery. SVT’s version of “Curry” didn’t occur in a vacuum — other groups like and have also performed the “Curry” song on public stages. : South Asian SEVENTEEN Fans Deserve to Be Heard

Is the Curry song made to mock indian people?

As OP already said the Curry Song was made to mock Indian people and the mv even includes brown face. There really is no excuse for stray kids here, the song was sung in Korean and they clearly understood at least the lyrics, even if their was no animosity and they may or may not be regretting it today.

Why Wonwoo’s choice of song is offensive to fans?

SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture Recently, there have been quite a few K-Pop artists receiving scrutiny for appropriating Indian culture. From Chungha ‘s to BLACKPINK ‘s, fans have been upset by the misuse of cultural items to fit their concepts.

  1. SEVENTEEN ‘s Wonwoo is the next idol to come under scrutiny for a brief moment in their latest Going SEVENTEEN episode that had fans fuming from his insensitivity toward Indian culture.
  2. With the help of Hoshi to reach higher notes by pulling his sideburns, Wonwoo began to sing lines from Norazo ‘s track “Curry”.

As soon as Indian fans saw the moment, they were far from happy about it. Why? Your browser does not support video. The lyrics of the song are full of offensive stereotypes about Indian culture. Fixating only on parts of their culture, like curry and yoga, to paint an inaccurate and false picture of how expansive Indian culture truly is. That’s why Carats are demanding that Wonwoo’s singing part should be removed from the episode and re-uploaded without the offensive song. Since they’ve done the same for previous Going SEVENTEEN moments where the members made lesser mistakes, fans want the same justice for this situation.

they deleted a live because jeonghan said fuck they reuploaded gose cus joshua sat on a FAKE us flag they 100% can reupload this shit — َ (@vivshua) Although Wonwoo may not have intentionally meant to offend anyone with his choice of song, fans also want an apology. Because he places importance on gaining knowledge, it can be a situation where he learns from his mistakes and gains insight into authentic Indian culture.

As of now, the episode still features his singing of the song. No statements have been made to address the issue. You can check out the offensive lyrics for yourself in the meantime. : SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture

Why is it called Curry and not Kari?

The first time I ever ate in a British curry house, it was 1991 and I’d just arrived in this country from Calcutta. My husband and I went to a restaurant in Cambridge, taken, I think, by some colleagues of his, intrigued to taste the food of home so many thousands of miles away.

What followed was one of the strangest meals I’d ever eaten. The “royal rice” had clearly been dyed with food colouring, not coloured naturally with turmeric or saffron. The saag paneer was made with cottage cheese and spinach. And there was something called a balti, which really threw me because, in Hindi, balti means bucket.

The whole meal was a puzzle. Things that should have been savoury were oddly sweet, there was no balancing of spices and too much cream. It was all off-kilter. I could hear that the people in the kitchen speaking Sylheti, from the north-eastern region of Bangladesh, so I’d have expected the recipes to be different to the ones I grew up with in West Bengal, or even those my Bangladeshi husband grew up eating – more on the hyper regionality of Indian cookery later – but the food certainly shouldn’t have been so rich, nor so flavourless.

With that first taste of Indian cuisine in Britain it was clear that, in this country, chefs that looked like me were pandering to a palate that was not their own. They mellowed spices, rounded corners with sugar and dampened authenticity with cream and ghee – rarely used in South Asian cooking because it’s so incredibly hot.

And, for some reason, this strange incarnation of the food of my homeland was called “curry”. Last week, a South Asian food blogger criticised the overuse of the C-word, pointing out that it is rooted in British colonialism. Chaheti Bansal posted an Instagram video calling on people to “cancel the word ‘curry'”.

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There’s a saying that the food in India changes every 100km, and yet we’re still using this umbrella term popularised by white people who couldn’t be bothered to learn the actual names of our dishes,” she said. “But we can still unlearn.” Immediately, it became a talking point, the latest in the culture wars that these days seem to drown out nuanced debate, with one side holding up a single word as a pillar of racism, the other professing freedom of speech and hyper sensitivity.

So is it racist to refer to “ordering a curry”? Let’s start with the word itself. Whole books have been written about the historical origins of the term, but it goes back to the early 1500s when the Portuguese first captured Goa and asked what the people were eating.

  • Supposedly, they replied using a word like “kari”, a Tamil word which refers to the gravy that particular dish was finished with.
  • Curry” is the anglicisation of that word.
  • It isn’t Indian and, even if it was, one word couldn’t hope to encompass all the many different dishes the term “curry” attempts to cover in English.

Is the word itself racist? No – but it is incorrect. It doesn’t really mean anything. It homogenises a cuisine that is infinitely varied. And it does have roots in Britain’s colonial past (a past this country is only really beginning to get to grips with).

It also, frankly, doesn’t take such a lot of effort not to use that it should really be all that big of a deal. It doesn’t offend me as a word and it doesn’t constitute a slur. But it’s lazy, and laziness breeds ignorance. The trouble is, racism tends to simmer under the surface and come out in these kinds of moments, when someone suddenly says you can no longer use a word you have never given much thought to before.

It’s uncomfortable to be told “you’ve been saying that wrong for years and it could be offensive to a whole group of people”. But it isn’t the word that is hard to stomach, it’s the ignorance it represents. It isn’t language that matters, it’s people. And if you’re lazy with your choice of language, it sends the message that you don’t care about the people those words represent.

  • I agree that it tends to be pretty unhelpful to make a word the basis for a conversation about really entrenched cultural associations.
  • The bigger picture is that it is still the case that Indian cooking and culture is still seen as somehow less than in this country.
  • While French and Italian food is elevated and superior, Asian food is cheap and cheerful, not worthy of a £95 tasting menu.

In fact, it’s hugely complex, involves ancient techniques and expertly layered flavours. Arguing over one word does tend to reduce the bigger, more profound conversations we need to have to something trivial, but if it’s a spat about the word curry that gets people talking about how we view South Asian culture then so be it.

And food, don’t forget, is culture. My food is in my DNA. It isn’t something I just eat, it nourishes my soul, it’s my identity, it reflects my heritage. I think it’s why it was so startling all those years ago to eat something professing to be a bit of me which had so clearly been created to satisfy someone else.

I mean no disrespect to the chefs at that Cambridge curry house. In fact, I owe them a huge debt of gratitude. I stand on the shoulders of the people who opened the first curry houses in Seventies Britain. They came here at a time when someone who was Bangladeshi or Indian couldn’t rent a property.

  • It was a hostile environment and running a restaurant was hard work.
  • I don’t know how they did it day in and day out, but their resilience and innovation changed the palate of a nation.
  • I often talk to people in their 50s about their early memories of Indian food and they talk about when Madhur Jaffrey came along and their mother started cooking “exotic” Indian food, usually using curry powder in lieu of the real deal.

I’ve talked to enough Brits about this to know that pudding on nights when Jaffrey’s recipes came out tended to be canned pineapple. Quite what it was about a canned pineapple that was deemed a classic Indian dessert, I’m still yet to understand. I don’t begrudge those early incarnations of South Asian cooking in Seventies British kitchens.

In fact, there are now restaurants in India serving the anglicised versions of South Asian cuisine like chicken tikka masala. Change happens slowly; it relies on diverse voices in the public eye using the correct terminology and those words filtering through via osmosis. Home cooks today understand spicing far more than they once did and have more respect for traditional recipes.

Millennials now have a far better understanding of the regionality of South Asian cooking because they have all eaten street food and have grown up on the internet. The younger generation of eaters and chefs give me hope. I hope that it won’t be long before a debate about whether or not it is appropriate to refer to a dish as a curry will seem archaic.

Until then, use the word if you want to, but while you’re doing so, make an effort to understand what you’re saying. Educate yourself about Britain’s complicated relationship with South Asia. Read about the origins of this complicated, varied, hyper-regional, delicious food that, in 2021, you can enjoy all over the country.

Asma Khan is the chef-owner of Darjeeling Express As told to Eleanor Steafel

Did you know Stray Kids sang the Curry song?

r/kpoprants – Stray Kids Sang the Curry Song and I didn’t know I would be this hurt. I don’t know if anyone else knew this but I just stumbled upon where they were doing Karaoke and one of the song they sang was the Curry song, People might be thinking Many kpop groups have done this then why attack only SKZ? It’s because I like them, a lot.

It hurt me so bad that I don’t think I can see them the same way.,What hurts even more is that the song was in KOREAN, a language that they understand. It clearly mocked and made fun of Indians left and right. I just had to pause the video and take a deep breath. I was crying actually, There was a sudden anger and sadness in my chest that made me want to delete all the pictures and not associate myself with them.

Also, wanted to rant about it, hence I’m here. It calls Indians curry munchers, and farmers. In the music video the artist even does brown face and also the instruments of the song are very middle eastern which shows how they stereotype desi ppl and middle eastern ppl as the same thing.

This song was made almost 10 years ago and tho the original creator of the song has apologized, it is still sadly a very popular song in Korea and no one sees the utter racism in it. Even our idols The people in the comments said ‘They apologized for Hurting black fans and all their OTHER racist actions’.

Like these OTHER racist actions didn’t really matter to them. I read their apology and as well as it was worded it translated to me as ‘Sorry for hurting the Black Fans and also if we did anything racist other than this, sorry.’ To me it was a vague little ‘I messed up a lot of times but since Black fans were calling us out, we had to apologize and now that I’m taking my time out and apologizing I’ll waste a little less time and apologize for everything else I did even though I don’t know what I did’.

  • Their entire apology revolved around Black fans and I am happy they got an apology but they did the curry song and I’m not going to take their apology that was mainly directed towards black fans as an apology for the curry song.
  • Hyunjin and SKZ probably learnt now cause they received backlash.
  • I realized that Kpop idols don’t apologize or tend to take things lightly unless they receive backlash and Indians didn’t call them out on the Curry song so they don’t care about it.
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I literally tried searching but found little to nothing on calling them out. Even their had fans cheering for them and not calling them out on the song. What’s weird is that even I didn’t know, cause I remember watching that episode a year ago but didn’t know it was a curry song until I stumbled upon the video today that actually pointed it out.

  1. So most of the Indians who watched the episode back then didn’t even know it was mocking them and enjoyed the episode like the fools we are.
  2. I WANT them to know that what they did with the curry song actually hurt a few people but because we didn’t make a big noise about it that’s why they didn’t care too much about it,

Every time people mention the problematic things Stray Kids did they always mention the braids and the N word and the Hyunjin incident, never this. I believe that when people do something racist even if they are not educated in it, they must take a look at their actions and LEARN why people are behaving the way they are.

I don’t even want an apology, I just want them to know it hurts, a lot. EDIT- There was a girl on youtube under the very video who kept arguing that on a vlive they apologized to Indian fans in particular for singing the curry song, when I asked her if she was talking about the insta apology she said No they went live and apologized which I am very sure they did not but if they did apologize to Indian fans in PARTICULAR please link the video in the comments.

I always saw people saying Even if idols apologize, we can still be hurt by it. I never understood but now I do. : r/kpoprants – Stray Kids Sang the Curry Song and I didn’t know I would be this hurt.

Is Norazo’s “Curry” really that controversial?

He has apologised, and explained his intentions. Koreaboo July 16th, 2020 Norazo ‘s Jo Bin has issued an apology for their group song “Curry”, ten years after it’s release. |@mr.jobin/Instagram A few days ago, a controversy regarding SEVENTEEN ‘s Wonwoo singing a few seconds of “Curry” erupted, and left fans extremely angry about the song’s racist stereotyping of Indian culture. Along with criticizing Norazo for the song, anger was also directed towards Wonwoo for singing the song in the first place. The lyrics of the song they covered. This is an ugly mess. Read it and try to tell me this isn’t racist. pic.twitter.com/XR35Bf6tst — miku⁷ (@jjkooromi) July 21, 2016 The controversy eventually reached Norazo’s Jo Bin, the original singer-songwriter of the song, and he uploaded an apology to his official Instagram account.

He began by trying to explain that Norazo as a group were not racist, and also claimed that he had no idea of the connotations that the word “curry” carries for Indians, and did not believe his actions to be wrong at the time. Norazo are not racist and do not insult religions! I’ve heard from people of Indian descent today that curry is not a part of real Indian food.

The reason why I ended up working on the song without checking the facts was because I lived in Korea while knowing false information about the history of curry, so I was taught to think, “Curry is Indian food!” As a result, I did not realize what the words I used to express India as a homeland actually meant and how sacred they were! This was surely my mistake! —Norazo’s Jo Bin He then apologized for his lack of knowledge on the matter, and hoped that fans and netizens would stop criticizing their hoobae group SEVENTEEN for Norazo’s mistake.

From now on, we’ll be sure to be singers who make and sing songs with proper information! We apologize to people of India and Southern Asia who were hurt by this! And lastly, just like us, our hoobae singers didn’t know it could be conveyed that way! We hope that this song, which was ignorant about another country’s tradition, will not hurt our hoobae singers who are on their world tour while loving the fans and cultures of other countries! —Norazo’s Jo Bin He further explained his intentions in his caption, and in both Korean and English, he wrote: The writing I wrote is not intended to encourage disputes.

I wanted everyone to be comfortable. Sorry. You have no choice but to close the feedback window. The opinion window can be a place of controversy with each other! May everyone see us with understanding and love. We will definitely grow in a good direction! —Norazo’s Jo Bin Read the whole apology here: Norazo are not racist and do not insult religions! I’ve heard from people of Indian descent today that curry is not a part of real Indian food. The reason why I ended up working on the song without checking the facts was because I lived in Korea while knowing false information about the history of curry, so I was taught to think, “Curry is Indian food!” As a result, I did not realize what the words I used to express India as a homeland actually meant and how sacred they were! This was surely my mistake! All we wanted to do was let it be known that curry is a delicious food that anybody can enjoy through our Norazo style! I want to say that we didn’t write the song with the intent to put anyone down or cut down the culture or tradition of a precious country! From now on, we’ll be sure to be singers who make and sing songs with proper information! We apologize to people of India and Southern Asia who were hurt by this! And lastly, just like us, our hoobae singers didn’t know it could be conveyed that way! We hope that this song, which was ignorant about another country’s tradition, will not hurt our hoobae singers who are on their world tour while loving the fans and cultures of other countries! —Norazo’s Jo Bin Norazo’s “Curry” was released in 2010, and following Wonwoo’s controversy, this is the first time that the controversial nature of the song has been addressed. |”Curry” MV/YouTube As there have been repeated controversies regarding artists and their appropriation of cultures, most recently Indian, fans hope that there will be no more instances like this, and demand for more respect towards all cultures.

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Why Wonwoo’s choice of song is offensive to fans?

SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture Recently, there have been quite a few K-Pop artists receiving scrutiny for appropriating Indian culture. From Chungha ‘s to BLACKPINK ‘s, fans have been upset by the misuse of cultural items to fit their concepts.

SEVENTEEN ‘s Wonwoo is the next idol to come under scrutiny for a brief moment in their latest Going SEVENTEEN episode that had fans fuming from his insensitivity toward Indian culture. With the help of Hoshi to reach higher notes by pulling his sideburns, Wonwoo began to sing lines from Norazo ‘s track “Curry”.

As soon as Indian fans saw the moment, they were far from happy about it. Why? Your browser does not support video. The lyrics of the song are full of offensive stereotypes about Indian culture. Fixating only on parts of their culture, like curry and yoga, to paint an inaccurate and false picture of how expansive Indian culture truly is. That’s why Carats are demanding that Wonwoo’s singing part should be removed from the episode and re-uploaded without the offensive song. Since they’ve done the same for previous Going SEVENTEEN moments where the members made lesser mistakes, fans want the same justice for this situation.

  • They deleted a live because jeonghan said fuck they reuploaded gose cus joshua sat on a FAKE us flag they 100% can reupload this shit — َ (@vivshua) Although Wonwoo may not have intentionally meant to offend anyone with his choice of song, fans also want an apology.
  • Because he places importance on gaining knowledge, it can be a situation where he learns from his mistakes and gains insight into authentic Indian culture.

As of now, the episode still features his singing of the song. No statements have been made to address the issue. You can check out the offensive lyrics for yourself in the meantime. : SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture

Why did Wonwoo start singing lines from Norazo’s ‘Curry’?

SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture Recently, there have been quite a few K-Pop artists receiving scrutiny for appropriating Indian culture. From Chungha ‘s to BLACKPINK ‘s, fans have been upset by the misuse of cultural items to fit their concepts.

  1. SEVENTEEN ‘s Wonwoo is the next idol to come under scrutiny for a brief moment in their latest Going SEVENTEEN episode that had fans fuming from his insensitivity toward Indian culture.
  2. With the help of Hoshi to reach higher notes by pulling his sideburns, Wonwoo began to sing lines from Norazo ‘s track “Curry”.

As soon as Indian fans saw the moment, they were far from happy about it. Why? Your browser does not support video. The lyrics of the song are full of offensive stereotypes about Indian culture. Fixating only on parts of their culture, like curry and yoga, to paint an inaccurate and false picture of how expansive Indian culture truly is. That’s why Carats are demanding that Wonwoo’s singing part should be removed from the episode and re-uploaded without the offensive song. Since they’ve done the same for previous Going SEVENTEEN moments where the members made lesser mistakes, fans want the same justice for this situation.

  • They deleted a live because jeonghan said fuck they reuploaded gose cus joshua sat on a FAKE us flag they 100% can reupload this shit — َ (@vivshua) Although Wonwoo may not have intentionally meant to offend anyone with his choice of song, fans also want an apology.
  • Because he places importance on gaining knowledge, it can be a situation where he learns from his mistakes and gains insight into authentic Indian culture.

As of now, the episode still features his singing of the song. No statements have been made to address the issue. You can check out the offensive lyrics for yourself in the meantime. : SEVENTEEN’s Wonwoo Called Out For Singing Offensive Song Stereotyping Indian Culture

What is Curry and is it British?

Why Is The Curry Song Offensive Curry has been used as a blanket term for any gravy-based dish (Representative Image) There is a war brewing on social media over a simple word: curry. Over the last few days, several people have offered their take on whether or not the term “curry” has racist overtones – as suggested by an Indian-American food blogger.

  • According to Sky News, it all began when food blogger Chaheti Bansal, 27, shared an Instagram video earlier this year urging people to “cancel the word curry” since it has its roots in British imperialism.
  • Ms Bansal, who lives in California, said in her now-viral video that the term “curry” has been misused in the West to describe any dish made on the Asian subcontinent.

Curry is an umbrella term “popularised by white people who couldn’t be bothered to learn the actual names of our dishes,” she said. Curry has often been named as one of Britain’s favourite dishes. It has long been used as a blanket term to describe any South Asian dish with gravy or stew – but as an associate professor at the University of Vermont points out, the word “curry” itself does not exist in any South Asian language.

  • The word curry does not exist in any South Asian language to my knowledge,” said Professor Morgenstein Fuerst to NBC News,
  • Curry is one of these words that most historians attribute to the British bad ear.” There are different theories on the word’s origin, but the most popular says that British colonisers misheard the Tamil word “kari”.

British officers in 1850s India started labelling all desi dishes as curry as a way to avoid learning their different names of regional dishes, said Ms Fuerst. The controversy over curry has divided social media – with some agreeing with Chaheti Bansal’s take on the issue and others in vehement opposition to it.

  • Serious Indian food writers have been saying this for 50 years.
  • Ed simnett (@simnett) August 10, 2021 If the word ‘curry’ is now deemed to be racist, then I need to leave this planet with immediate effect.
  • Pic.twitter.com/T9c5Lvepqg — Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) August 10, 2021 Haha i think where she was coming from was this: people seem to always generalise indian liquid-based dishes as ‘curry’ and that she probably just wanted people to be more specific about the variation.

Almost as if people call all Italian carb-based dish as just pasta. — Kazim K (@kazimkzz) August 10, 2021 “As a person of Indian heritage, curry is not and will never be racist,” said one Twitter user. As a person of Indian heritage, curry is not and will never be racist, just absurd 🤦🏽‍♂️ I’m pretty sure anyone with half a braincell would agree.

— Nakul (@NakulX) August 10, 2021 “I also hate too much usage of curry word as all-encompassing term,” another countered. I also hate too much usage of curry word as all encompassing term. Negative stereotype created by British colonialism. https://t.co/KBDibNWVVc — krishan (@YeoKrishan) August 10, 2021 Cyrus Todiawala, the Indian chef behind Cafe Spice Namaste, has dismissed Ms Bansal’s claim.

According to the Express, Mr Todiawala insisted the word “curry” is not racist but said that lack of “information” about the diversity of Indian cuisine has led to its widespread usage. Where do you stand on this debate? Let us know using the comments section.